Timney 667 AR-15 trigger: Finally!!

After nearly two years shooting my Ruger SR-556 I finally broke down and bought an aftermarket trigger for it. I had long considered this purchase and after looking at Chip McCormack, Geissele and Timney I finally decided on the excellent Timney AR-15 competition trigger. The specific model I chose was the 667, which is the 3 lb. pull version. I also went with the solid trigger shoe since I could see no reason to pay another $25 for something (skeletonized trigger) that is essentially cosmetic. Don’t get me wrong, I love beautiful things but a trigger is, well, a trigger. Continue reading “Timney 667 AR-15 trigger: Finally!!”

Firearms4u: where are you?

It’s been four months since I last posted anything on this blog and for that I am sincerely sorry. Life has been very busy. The good news is that things have settled down sufficiently that I can now return to posting on a regular basis. Several things have developed that I think will be of interest so please stay tuned. First up: USPSA Production bullets: finally moving to 147gr “heavyweights”.

SureFire Shot Timer: Excellent Free Training Tool

Prior to purchasing a dedicated shot timer I took a look around the Apple app store and found Surefire’s shot timer application, called simply “Shot Timer”. It was and is still free and is arguably more polished than many commercial applications. The basic functions of generating a starting sound and timing subsequent shots is done nicely. The only problems I have ever encountered were 1) the starting beep isn’t terribly loud (tough if you don’t have amplified earmuffs) and 2) the sensitivity adjustments are a little challenging. Once dialed in the system works quite well. The trick seems to be to find the precise spot where your shots are detected but spurious signals are ignored. For example, I have noticed that when sensitivity is slightly low, not all shots are detected. Likewise, when too high it Continue reading “SureFire Shot Timer: Excellent Free Training Tool”

Pistol Review: S&W 22A

S&W 22A 5.5″ barrel model

Some years ago I found myself in the local gun shop looking at the various pistols when I found myself staring at a pistol I’d never seen before. It was a blocky looking thing with a Weaver rail covering the entire top of the gun. This was my first encounter with the Smith & Wesson 22A, a semi-auto .22lr pistol. Having shot the Rugers and Buckmarks forever I was intrigued by this pistol. It had a more classic semi-auto look and the price was right so I bought it. Continue reading “Pistol Review: S&W 22A”

2A: Shotgun Importation Ban and its impact on Practical Shooting

With the May 1st deadline looming, I decided to send in an email to the BATFE’s working group for the pending ban of certain shotguns. You can do likewise by sending your comment to shotgunstudy@atf.gov.

Here’s what I wrote:

Hello

I am writing to express my deep concern regarding the current shotgun importation ban now under consideration. I am a member of the United States Practical Shooting Association and I use shotguns for competition that are designed with many of the 10 features that are being considered as criteria for banning a shotgun from importation. Telescoping stocks, pistol grips, extended magazines, compensators and additional mounting rails are critically important in our sport. To say these guns serve no sporting purpose is to deny practical shooting as a sport in general.  This may be convenient for your current purposes but it is wrong. The working group cannot use potential repercussions as a reason for denying facts. Namely that practical shotgun shooting is a highly popular sport thereby making many of the shotgun features under consideration “generally recognized as particularly suitable for or readily adaptable to sporting purposes.” Continue reading “2A: Shotgun Importation Ban and its impact on Practical Shooting”

Review: Berretta 92FS

In the 1970’s and ’80’s the US military held a competition to select the replacement for the 1911. The new pistol would be required to fire the 9mm NATO cartridge and would be have to meet rigorous reliability and durability standards. After most of two decades and several restarts, the Beretta 92F was selected, narrowly beating the Sig P226 mostly due to cost. Designated the M9, this pistol’s story bears some similarity to the M16 rifle. Both were to use a NATO-standard round and both Continue reading “Review: Berretta 92FS”

Pistol Review: Ruger LC9

Ruger LC9

When I first heard about Ruger’s follow-up to the LCP, the LC9, I was immediately interested. On a personal level I find the idea of using 9mm for a deep-concealment pistol very attractive. I like keeping my calibers to a minimum and since I reload 9mm it makes practicing a lot simpler and cheaper. In the case of .380 ammo, much cheaper. So it was very exciting when I finally got the chance to shoot one yesterday. Continue reading “Pistol Review: Ruger LC9”

CED M2: Chronograph that does it all

CED M2 Chronograph Main Unit

For those of us that reload for competitive shooting, knowing a round’s velocity is critical. In USPSA the all-important Power Factor is determined by multiplying velocity and bullet weight then dividing by 1000. Example: 124gr bullets traveling at 1050 fps yield a PF of 130.2 (124 x 1050 = 130,200 / 1000 = 130.2). With USPSA Production having a minimum Minor PF of 125, the above results would comfortably make the necessary minimum PF. In order to determine whether our rounds make the grade we must reliably measure velocity. We do that with a chronograph. While there are many fine units on the market, one company’s offering stands out: the CED M2. Continue reading “CED M2: Chronograph that does it all”

CETME .308 battle rifle: a brief history

There seems to be a lot of confusion about the genesis of the CETME assault rifle. The story goes like this: Towards the end of WWII, the Germans developed the StG44

StG44 "Sturm Gewehr"

Sturmgewehr, which is considered the first true Assault Rifle. It was late in the war and the gun never saw full production. Also under development was the similar StG45, which would become the basis for the CETME. At the war’s conclusion Ludwig Vorgrimler, a german engineer, joined the development team at Centro de Estudios Técnicos de Materiales Especiales (Center for Technical Studies of Special Materials) Continue reading “CETME .308 battle rifle: a brief history”