Magpul CTR butt stock: my favorite AR stock.

Magpul_logo_animate_bigAs you probably know, I like Magpul products…a lot. How could I not? They make really great things that do exactly what they are supposed to do and they just run and run. I’ve mentioned the CTR stock in several posts but I thought it deserved a direct treatment, so here goes.

The collapsible or telescoping stock has been a standard component of the M4 since its inception. With its shorter barrel, flat top and short stock, the M4 was a light and nimble successor to the M16. In the civilian market the inclusion of a collapsible stock has become de facto. AR-15 owners have grown accustomed to the flexibility of the stock: you can shorten it up for stowing or transport or if you have on a lot of bulky clothing, load bearing gear, or body armor. It can also be extended for bench or bipod/tripod shooting thereby offering greater control when taking aim. There is little doubt of the value of a good collapsible stock. However, the standard model is in my opinion flawed. the latch release on the bottom can get caught on clothing, webbing or anything else that comes near, the sling mount is on the bottom (great for over-the-shoulder carry but useless for ready-carry) and the darned thing rattles around like a broken tailpipe. Luckily the stock comes off the buffer tube by simply hyper-extending the retention lever and can then be replaced.

Enter the Magpul CTR. This little gem has a number of nice features that place it head-and-shoulders above the standard stock. First, the spring-loaded retention pin is released by a lever that is fully enclosed within the body of the stock. No more hooking onto things! Second, the stock has a locking lever on the bottom-front that, once the stock is properly adjusted for length, is locked closed thereby holding the stock firmly in place. No more rattling! Third, the stock has four webbing slots for attaching slings and a Quick Disconnect swivel mount in the frame. This is a huge plus for me since it allows the use of those wonderful heavy-duty Daniel Defense Quick Disconnect swivel mounts I like so much. Also, the mount is ambidextrous and because of its tucked-away location it keeps the sling nice and close to the rifle and keeps the rifle in the proper orientation. It is a sturdy, clean method for mounting a sling. Finally, the commercial version comes standard with a nice rubber butt pad that helps keep the stock firmly connected to the shoulder when raised to the shooting position.

There are two versions of the CTR. Which one you need depends on your rifle. Most civilian AR-15s have buffer tubes with “Commercial” dimensions. Colt is the only manufacturer I know of that uses the “Military” spec on their civilian guns but there may be others. Always check your manufacturer’s specs before ordering your CTR. Even if you get the Mil-spec CTR you can still add the rubber pad if you like.

I have found that with the CTR, my check weld is at just the right location for my Eotech 5.12, Troy BUIS sights or my CompM3 on a 1/2″ Burris XTR Xtreme mount.

With its rugged construction, elegant design and drop-dead gorgeous looks, this is easily my favorite AR-15 stock.

About William Daugherty

William Daugherty is a firearms enthusiast, competitive shooter and Second Amendment advocate living in the Upper Connecticut River Valley region of Northern New England.
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